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Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota (PACIM) shared a memory. ...

How about a trip on a wooden raft? It's called Spływ Przełomem Dunajca The Dunajec River Gorge (in Polish Przełom Dunajca) is one of the best-known tourist attractions in the Pieniny Mountains. Wooden raft trips have been organized daily by Pieniny Gorals since the early 19th century — when their customers consisted mostly of guests of nearby Niedzica and Czorsztyn castles. Dunajec Gorge runs through the Pieniny Mountains in the south of Poland and the north of Slovakia (as Dunajec is the border river between the two countries in the area). It is featured on UNESCO's Tentative List of World Heritage Sites in Poland. The trip begins in the village of Sromowce Wyżne-Kąty, and ends in the resort town of Szczawnica, 18 km downstream. It takes about 2–3 hours. The second leg of the tour is only 5 km long. It begins in Szczawnica and ends in the town of Krościenko nad Dunajcem. The Gorge makes 7 loops in its length. The surrounding rock reaches 300 m in height almost all the way through. The gorge is part of a valley located within the Pieniny National Park. The landscape distinguishes it from surrounding mountains due to interaction of natural factors such as geological ground, relief, water, soil, climate, flora and fauna, and their evolutionary relationships. All these elements contribute to the complexity of the natural beauty of the whole area. The conditions for the development of unique flora and fauna are closely related to the limestone and dolomite rock strata. Literally, the rock is the foundation for this one-of-a-kind environment. There is the occurrence of the Carpathians' plant and animal species, in many cases endemic. #LetsRaft

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Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota (PACIM) shared Twin Cities Polish Festival's post. ...

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Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota (PACIM) shared Love Poland's post. ...

Mushrooms hunting, the time has come again. Mushrooms are popular in many countries, including Poland, because of their excellent taste and aroma. They can grace every, even the simplest dish such as scrambled eggs. Delicate mushrooms are great for soups, 'zapiekanka', sauces, and meat dishes — kania (parasol mushroom), maslak (bolete), kurka (chanterelle), pieczarka (white mushroom) and rydz (saffron milk cap). Every meat will also taste great with fried borowik (boletus) or podgrzybek (bay bolete). In Poland, where the very strong tradition of the mushroom hunting exists, mushrooms growing wild in forests are collected from time immemorial. The one called boletus (in Polish: 'borowik' or 'prawdziwek') are recognised as one of the noblest, and usually used for filling Christmas Eve 'uszka', or traditional Polish pierogi. Another example of delicious fungus is chanterelle mushroom (in Polish: 'kurka', sometimes 'liszka' or 'pieprznik') adored by Poles as well as others. An exquisite scrambled eggs are made with gently fried chanterelle. Another Polish dish that makes use of 'kurka' is a special and delicious sauce served with the pork neck, the sirloin or the pikeperch. On the other hand, parasol mushrooms (in Polish: 'kania') fried in a coating constitute the delicacy on the Christmas Eve table in many Polish homes. And these are just three examples. The mushroom hunting is a hobby of many people, whereas for the majority it is a way of spending time in the bosom of nature - recreational activity. The mushroom hunting remains cultivated in Poland also on account of culinary benefits and because of tradition that requires preparing some festive meals made of mushrooms. Polish cuisine knows a lot of dishes which consist of mushrooms. These are inter alia soup, sauces and stuffing. Moreover many mushrooms are dried for the Winter time. Beautiful aroma of mushrooms being dried stays afloat in home for many days. Wonderful appetizers results from some other mushrooms that are marinated. Poles preparing traditional dishes usually don't use white mushrooms easily available in groceries around the World. Polish dishes are always based on raw mushrooms (directly after picking, i.e. in Autumn time). In winter dried mushrooms are used. In many families mushroom hunting is an activity of grandmothers and grandfathers, who have lots of free time and find pleasure in walking in forest with the basket on the shoulder. Access to mushrooms isn't hampered for nobody, since in Autumn it is also possible to buy raw mushrooms at the markets in many towns, while in Winter, in the pre-Christmas period dried mushrooms turn up at groceries. The mushroom hunting is a great Slavic tradition. A long time ago mushroom hunting was a group activity. Friends, or members of families went to forest for the many hours' mushroom hunting. On their return dishes of the traditional Polish cuisine were concocted from gathered mushrooms. One could find the literary description of such collective mushroom huntings in Pan Tadeusz by Adam Mickiewicza. This poem is regarded in Poland as a national epic. Text via www.tastingpoland.com/food/mushrooms_in_polish_cuisine.html Photos: yotka.eu, steńca, wr.flog.pl, dlugosiodlo.pl, lenartpawel.pl, klaudynahebda.pl, gento5.flog.pl, topstars.pl, zjemto.blox.pl, smakizycia.pl, dobrarada.pl, ela-travel.pl, podlaskie klimaty,

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A Polish pillar from the past. At the 112 Hennepin Ave.construction site in Minneapolis, the developers of Montage Apartments have unearthed a Corinthian column from 1907 designed by Krakow-born architect Victor Cordella. The building was originally a tavern owned by the brewers of Grain Belt Beer that later became Nye's bar. Corinthian columns were one of Cordella's signature design elements, a motif he employed at a dozen Minnesota churches over two decades, Over the years, bar owners bricked over the original pillared entrance and added a neon Nye's sign above it. Learn more on Sept, 23 at Holy Cross Church, the site of a presentation on Cordella's works. See pacim,org for details. ...

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